Trade deal | Trump raises possibility of walking away from China deal

Evarado Alatorre
Marcha 16, 2019

A date is yet to be set for the summit that Trump and Xi Jingping were expected to hold this March at Trump's Mar-a-Lago property in Florida, and in-person talks between trade teams have not been held in more than two weeks.

US stocks were little changed in late afternoon trading on Thursday amid uncertainty over when a trade deal between the United States and China would be reached. We'll see. We have a very good relationship.

Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, the chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, said after the White House meeting with Trump that he urged the president and lawmakers "to solve this tariff issue on steel and aluminum". But Trump and other administration officials have since sought to portray the talks as still making progress.

For the record, I think the pause in tariffs is a good thing because tariffs are a bad idea in the first place.

US President Donald Trump said that whether a trade deal can be reached with China would probably be known in the next three or four weeks. "Substantial" Progress With China (Just Don't Ask Where) in response to Trump's Tweets.

Trump recently ended a summit in Vietnam with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un without a peace deal.

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Chinese officials have also bristled at the appearance of the deal being one-sided, and are wary of the risk of Trump walking away even if Xi were to travel to the US.

Washington and Beijing have been locked in a tit-for-tat tariff battle as USA officials press China for an end to practices and policies it argues have given Chinese firms unfair advantages, including subsidizing of industry, limits on access for foreign companies and alleged theft of intellectual property.

Any deal will have a "very clear enforcement provision", Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in congressional testimony on Thursday, noting that he and Lighthizer spoke the night before with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He.

The United States and China have slapped import duties on each other's products that have cost the world's two largest economies billions of dollars, roiled markets and disrupted manufacturing supply chains. I want the deal to be right, much more importantly.

"And then if one gets done, it will be something that people are going to be talking about for a long time because we have been really taken advantage of for a long time".

"We'll have news on China".

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