Google Lookout describes surroundings to visually impaired users using AI

Ceria Alfonso
Marcha 15, 2019

It also functions in the same way as Lens - receiving information and providing feedback based on what is captured on the device's rear camera.

The developers were working hard to improve the functionality and the overall user interface of this app since it was announced last year during the I/O conference last year.

Apart from identifying the objects through the AI technology, the app is also capable enough to read the text, labels, scan barcodes and much more.

Moreover, Google claims that the app won't always work with 100% accuracy, and it will continue to develop the app as it gets more feedback from users.

Google has launched a new app called Lookout, which is created to give the visually impaired verbal information about their surroundings, using artificial intelligence technology.

Lookout is primarily created to work in "situations where people might typically have to ask for help"; Google cites examples like "learning about a new space for the first time, reading text or documents" and daily tasks like "cooking, cleaning, and shopping".

The Lookout App aims to provide assistance to the blind and visually-impaired users who can't see things with their eyes. Unfortunately, a very small percentage of that staggering number can actually download Lookout from the Play Store right now, as initial support is limited to Pixel phones in the USA running Android 8.0 and above.

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Announced back at Google I/O previous year, Lookout is now available on Google Pixel phones in the US.

It launched two new apps for Android last month, Live Transcribe and Sound Amplifier, which were created to help the deaf and hard-of-hearing community. As it communicates with the caller, Assistant would display a transcription of the conversation in real-time.

The app has been made available exclusively for Google's Pixel users in the United States by Google.

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The pair of apps will make audio more accessible, with Live Transcribe turning real-world speech into captions in real-time, and Sound Amplifier distinguishing sounds using headphones.

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