Italy bans unvaccinated children from attending school

Maricruz Casares
Marcha 13, 2019

A 2017 law mandated children enrolled in Italian schools receive 10 different vaccines, the Times wrote, in "response to a worrisome decline in vaccinations nationwide and a measles outbreak that same year".

Children can not attend nursery schools unless they are vaccinated, and parents of elementary and middle school pupils risk fines of up to 500 euros if they don't have doctor's notes showing that their children were vaccinated against the required diseases.

Those aged between six and 16 can not be banned from attending school, but their parents face fines if they do not complete the mandatory course of immunisations.

Children have been reportedly told to not turn up to school unless they can prove they have been vaccinated.

Health Minister Giulia Grillo said the rules were now simple: "No vaccine, no school".

More news: Firebomb Hurled at Israeli Police on Temple Mount, Sparking Riots and Shutdown

Some children were denied entry to schools on Tuesday but the numbers appeared to be modest.

The mandatory vaccinations include chickenpox, polio, mumps, rubella, and - perhaps most crucially at this time - measles.

Unvaccinated children are now banned from attending preschool in Italy, as a new law came into effect this week.

According to the BBC, the local authority in Bologna has already sent letters of suspension to the parents of approximately 300 kindergarten children and around 5,000 don't have up-to-date vaccination documentation.

But up until Tuesday, a temporary measure meant students could remain in school as long as their parents said they were vaccinated. It threatened to overturn the mandatory vaccination law passed by the previous government but ended up scrapping its plans in the face of criticism as the country experienced a measles outbreak last summer.

Otros informes por

Discuta este artículo

SIGUE NUESTRO PERIÓDICO