Rochester Area Could See Three Rounds of Snow Starting Sunday

Evarado Alatorre
Febrero 11, 2019

SEATTLE-Residents of the Pacific Northwest took to neighborhood hills with skis, sleds or even just laundry baskets February 9 to celebrate an unusual dump of snow in a region more accustomed to winter rain.

For Sunday, KIRO 7's Morgan Palmer predicts a "quick-hitting weaker system", with a couple of inches of snow in south Seattle.

That hasn't stopped Seattle's dogs from making the most of the surprise snow day.

Meanwhile, cold temperatures are expected in the region overnight Saturday, with temperatures dropping to 15-20 degrees and the wind chill in the single digits.

Cloudy weather will keep Sunday morning temperatures above freezing: expect lows in the upper 30s to low 40s.

The National Weather Service said gusts hit 40 miles per hour (64 kph) in some areas, and authorities said residents on the islands' north shores should be prepared for coastal flooding.

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Meanwhile, forecasters are closely monitoring a potent storm system that's predicted to come out of the Rockies on Monday.

More central areas of Washington state have been inundated with snow drifts of up to 3-4ft (1m-1.2m) in places, the Associated Press reports.

More than 120 people were rescued on Thursday from a Sierra Nevada, California, resort after being trapped by snow for five days. The National Weather Service office in Eureka reported accumulating snow at sea level. As many as 50 housing structures were damaged near Yosemite National Park by toppled trees during a snowstorm.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee declared a state of emergency over the storm.

Elsewhere, more than 148,000 customers lost power in MI following days of freezing rain. A 59-year-old man died Thursday from exposure at a Seattle light rail station. "I think that Portlanders, majority are city people and they come from a lot of different places, so they're not so used to it".

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