Tropical depression forms in the Atlantic; three other disturbances tracked

Federico Mansilla
Setiembre 24, 2018

Kirk is the 11th named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season, which lasts until November 30.

Tropical Storm Kirk, which formed Saturday, has winds of 40 miles per hour and is moving west at 18 miles per hour as of Sunday morning. The storm continued to pack maximum sustained winds of 40 mph with tropical storm-force winds extending out 70 miles from Kirk's center.

Like every other tropical cyclone which has approached the Lesser Antilles from the east this season, Kirk is expected to run into strong westerly shear in 4-5 days, resulting in weakening as the cyclone gets closer to the islands.

However, Barbados is likely to experience moderate to heavy showers and occasional gusty winds from the system as it moves across the island chain late Monday into Tuesday.

"Low- to mid-level ridging over the eastern Atlantic is expected to cause Kirk to move even faster toward the west during the next couple of days, reaching speeds of at least 22 kt in 24-36 hours".

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Some strengthening is forecast through Sunday, with little change in intensity forecast on Monday and Tuesday. Kirk is moving toward the west-northwest near 16 miles per hour.

The NHC said that it will not be issuing any more advisories on Tropical Depression Eleven as it degenerated into a "trough of low pressure".

Tropical Storm Kirk was accelerating westward over the eastern tropical Atlantic as Subtropical Storm Leslie formed Sunday, the National Hurricane Center said.

Forecasters say it now poses no threats to land. So far, none of these systems are expected to have direct impact on the Florida peninsula. That disturbance constitutes the remnants of Hurricane Florence, which saturated the Carolinas with rain and wind last week. The storm traveled due west and with slow intensification was named Tropical Storm Isaac the following day.

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