Louisville takes Papa John's off name of Cardinal Stadium

Jose Verdugo
Julio 13, 2018

Since then, the fallout has been swift: Schnatter resigned from the school's board of trustees and as Papa John's chairman.

Schnatter submitted his resignation Wednesday as a member of the university's board of trustees after Louisville National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) called for Schnatter to either step down or be removed from the board, according to the Courier-Journal. The company also confirmed that it has no plans to rename the brand. She said her conversation with Schnatter "was to share that we had made the decision".

On Wednesday, Schnatter acknowledged the truth of a Forbes story that said he used the N-word during a discussion about public relations with the company's outside marketing agency in May.

It's not yet clear how quickly the company will be able to remove Schnatter from marketing materials, the person with knowledge of the decision said. Take, for example, one from the summer of 2016, when Schnatter's usual red Papa John's shirt was replaced with a "Ghostbusters" jumpsuit in a 30-second TV spot and on a movie-themed pizza box. It was still there as of Friday morning.

Schnatter's controversial comment came during a role-playing exercise during a May conference call, which itself was organized in the wake of his comments concerning the NFL, and placing blame on the league's national anthem protests for the company's sales, Forbes reported.

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"Five years from now, they might be able to start bringing him back".

Papa John's latest controversy has begun to cost the brand relationships with baseball teams across the majors.

Louisville president Neeli Bendapudi announced Friday the school will strip the Papa John's name from its football stadium, renaming it Cardinal Stadium. When asked how he would distance himself from racist groups, Schnatter reportedly complained that Colonel Sanders never faced a backlash for using the word.

Schnatter also allegedly stated that, in his home state of in, "people used to drag African-Americans from trucks until they died", reportedly intending for the sentiment to convey his opposition to racism. "Regardless of the context, I apologize".

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