Americans are thanking Canada to show their support for Trudeau

Evarado Alatorre
Junio 14, 2018

President Donald Trump and Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participate in the working session at the G7 Summit in Quebec, Canada, June 8, 2018.

U.S. President Donald Trump said Tuesday he would inflict economic punishment on "the people of Canada" because Prime Minister Justin Trudeau spoke publicly against Trump's tariffs.

Navarro now regrets the "inappropriate" language he used, he admitted at a Wall Street Journal event on Tuesday.

Following Trump's departure from the G7 summit, Trudeau said Saturday at a press conference that US steel and aluminum tariffs against Canada on national security grounds were "kind of insulting" and that Canada "will not be pushed around". This triggered a fiery response from U.S. President Donald Trump, who called Trudeau "very dishonest and weak" on the same day.

Both aides accused Trudeau of betraying Trump, a Republican, at a news conference held after the US president had departed Canada. He said Trudeau's promise to follow through with tariffs on USA goods - a response to Trump's own tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Canada, Mexico, and the European Union - would hurt the Canadian economy.

Tweeting from Singapore where he's scheduled to hold a nuclear summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, Trump wrote: "Sorry, we can not let our friends, or enemies, take advantage of us on trade anymore". "It's very unfair, and it's very unfair to our workers, and I'm gonna straighten it out". Yesterday Ford said he stands "shoulder to shoulder" with the Liberal prime minister because Ontario jobs are at stake.

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Chris Coons, a Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations, told MSNBC Trump had welcomed authoritarian leaders in other countries even as he "picks fights as he just did at the G7 with our longest, oldest closest allies: democracies, developed Western countries like Canada".

His apology came days after Trump and Trudeau verbally sparred over the G7 summit in Canada.

No, if Mr. Trump really was as offended as he makes out, it wasn't caused by a Canadian failure to realize that American eyes are watching.

The explanation conflicted with Trump's justification of levying the tariffs via Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act, where he claimed that foreign steel and aluminum constitute a national security threat to the United States. "But if history tells us one thing, it is that no one nation's pre-eminence is eternal".

Dias is suggesting the federal government start looking at measures that stymie the flow of electricity, oil and other natural resources that go to the US. "Canadians - we're polite, we're reasonable - but we also will not be pushed around". "We're partners in the defense of North America", he said.

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