Norfolk MP persuaded not rebel on Brexit by prime minister

Evarado Alatorre
Junio 13, 2018

MPs in the House of Commons will vote on a raft of amendments produced by the House of Lords, including one at around 3 p.m. GMT (8.30 p.m. IST) that would give parliament an effective veto over Brexit.

The Brexit Secretary warned that the UK's entire approach to negotiations with the EU is at risk of being undermined by amendments to its flagship EU Withdrawal bill.

However, a potential rebellion by pro-Remain Tories over their demands for a "meaningful vote" on the final Brexit deal was only avoided after ministers agreed at the last moment to discuss a compromise.

Mr Grieve withdrew his own amendment, which would have given MPs powers to dictate what the Government should do if no acceptable agreement is reached by February 2019.

"There is an incentive for the European Union to reach a deal with us for obvious reasons of stability and certainty".

"We have not, and will not, agree to the House of Commons binding the government's hands in the negotiations".

They did so by offering a concession to Tory backbenchers.

"The government have conceded that this is necessary and I expect to see a new amendment to cover this situation soon".

The debate, which lasted for almost three hours, was split down the usual non-partisan lines that have emerged as a result of Brexit, with the likes of Labour's Kate Hoey and John Mann saying they would back the Conservative government, while Tories including Ken Clarke and Anna Soubry spoke in favour of Grieve.

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Phillip Lee, who resigned this morning, gave an impassioned speech from the "naughty corner" on the backbenches - flanked by Remainers including Bob Neill, Nicky Morgan, receiving congratulations for his decision by Soubry and Sarah Wollaston.

May is seeking to overturn 14 of 15 amendments passed by the Lords earlier this year, but has a fight on her hands due to her fragile majority in the 650-seat Commons.

MPs were told that one parliamentarian had to be accompanied to a public meeting by a six armed police officers because of threats over their stance on Brexit.

Well what the Remainer MPs thought they heard from May does not seem compatible with Davis's red lines.

Ukip leader Gerard Batten said: "The only "meaningful vote" was the verdict of the people in referendum of 23rd June 2016".

The government was putting a combative spin on the concessions Tuesday evening: "The Brexit Secretary has set out three tests that any new amendment has to meet - not undermining the negotiations, not changing the constitutional role of Parliament and Government in negotiating worldwide treaties, and respecting the referendum result", a spokesperson for the Brexit department said in a statement. Although, as things stand, they will not be able to send the government back into negotiations if they reject an agreement with the EU.

"The main reason for my taking this decision now is the Brexit process and the government's wish to limit parliament's role in contributing to the final outcome in a vote that takes place today", he said in a statement released on his website.

The bill underpins the government's Brexit strategy. "That's what this House voted on Article 50".

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