Sinn Fein To Meet With Irish And UK Governments After Talks Fail

Evarado Alatorre
Febrero 15, 2018

The DUP leadership is said to have been "spooked" by the level of opposition to such an act, not only inside the party but in the wider unionist community.

The two parties, representing mainly Catholic proponents of a united Ireland and Protestant supporters of continued rule by Britain, have failed to meet a number of deadlines and the latest round of talks fell apart over disagreement on additional rights for Irish-language speakers.

He said clarity was needed on what exactly had been agreed between the two parties before they reached an impasse over a proposed Irish language act - a core Sinn Féin demand.

The DUP's Gregory Campbell said what Sinn Fein said "bears no resemblance to reality" and there was no draft deal.

"We need a budget for the Northern Ireland authorities and, obviously, at the moment I'm afraid we're not going to get it through a re-establishment of the devolved executive".

Sinn Fein has accused its erstwhile partners-in-government of backing out of an accommodation allegedly struck last week, claiming the main unionist party balked at criticism of the rumoured deal from some of its supporters.

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Britain's Northern Ireland Secretary, Karen Bradley, said in the absence of a Northern Ireland administration "other challenging decisions will have to be taken by the United Kingdom government".

Karen Bradley, the UK Government's current Northern Ireland Secretary, said negotiations had made "substantive progress", but admitted "it appears that this phase of talks is now at an end". He challenged the prime minister to "take forward issues such as equal marriage".

With the collapse of talks seeking to restore the devolved Northern Ireland Government, the Ancient Order of Hibernians has expressed its concern over the future of U.S. -brokered Good Friday Agreement, and has renewed calls for the appointment of a U.S. Special Envoy to the Northern Ireland peace and political process.

The parties are also at loggerheads on how Northern Ireland should be governed if talks ultimately fail.

He said he understood an accommodation on the key disputes was close and the parties were just hammering out how the deal would be presented.

Amid the furore over the DUP's decision to pull the plug on the talks, of which May and her Irish counterpart, Leo Varadkar, painted an optimistic picture during their joint visit to Belfast on Monday, gay marriage campaigners attended Stormont on Wednesday.

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