Russell Crowe apologises for joke about "sodomising" female co-star

Esequiel Farfan
Diciembre 8, 2017

Russell Crowe has come in for serious criticism after making a joke about "sodomising" a female co-star in the current climate of the post-Harvey Weinstein allegations of sexual abuse and harassment.

The actor was presenting the prize for Best Asian Film of the Year at the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards when he made a decision to reveal all about "sodomising" co-star Jacqueline McKenzie's character in his 1992 film Romper Stomper.

The 53-year-old apparently laughed as he told the joke, and said: "I was sodomising Jacqueline McKenzie (female co-star) on the set of Romper Stomper". Obviously I was only intending to make people laugh.

"Especially Jacquie, and she did".

"And it was actually my desire to keep the bits apart".

Crowe added: "I didn't mean any offence to anyone and it wasn't a comment on other issues". It wasn't until the opening night of the film that it was pointed out by none other than Jacqui McKenzie's lovely late mother that we were in fact, in her mind, engaged in sodomy. "Anyway that was just a story about sensitivity", the Noah actor added.

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McKenzie - who also happened to be present at the AACTAs - just last week revealed she had endured "sexual harassment, bullying, groping, lascivious comments and unwanted advances" during her long career as an actress.

She claimed to have reported the misconduct, which occurred when she was in her 20s, but said it was ignored.

"The people involved were protected, the behaviour was ignored or swept under the rug", she told The Australian. "One response to a legal letter I did send - demanding an assurance I would be safe on set - was met by the producer saying: "I can't give this letter to him [an actor], he'll go crazy".

McKenzie herself has defended Crowe, stating that there had been "no blurry lines" while shooting the sex scene in question and that the anecdote "bears no relevance" to the "very important conversation of sexual harassment in the workplace". As there should never be.

"Over the eons, he and I have often laughed at the awkwardness we felt shooting that scene".

"The irony -what we actors are asked to do in scenes and how we actually film them- is what we laugh at".

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